LIVE MUSIC REVIEW: Mister Twisted

Famed for its idiosyncratic vibrant decor, chilled vibes and zesty, colourful cocktails, The Zombie Shack is one of Manchester’s worst kept secrets. Nestled under the wing of Oxford Road Station, the small but charming gem of a venue has a reputation for being a popular tiki bar and for being a platform for both local emerging bands and more experienced groups to showcase their musical talent. Nights like last Thursday’s launch of Manchester five piece Mister Twisted’s  (left) new single organised by the band’s charismatic, guitarist and vocalist Ivan Holmes demonstrate just how the vivacious venue has earned such a reputation.

New Luna, Kady Jones

Photo courtesy of New Luna’s Facebook page.

 

 

 

Alternative rock band New Luna (@newlunaband), who also hail Manchester, warmed the crowd up, hitting the stage first. You got the impression the band had just broken onto the scene, with a raw, unassuming approach to their music. Bassist and singer Kady Jones, in particular seemed a little unsure of herself but with the band’s initial chilled vibes, Kady, along with the rest of the band, soon let lose, holding the crowd spellbound with their infectious, upbeat rifts that revealed New Luna’s true guitar driven colours.

More established alternative-rock band, The Eyres (theeyres.co.uk @TheEyres) brought an edgier, rockier ecstasy to the stage being a spritzy, drumtastic fusion of sublime instrumental beats blended with passionate lyrics that spoke directly to the crowd. The Night (B-Side) and their new single These Ghosts definitely deserve a nod.

The Eyres, These Ghosts

The Eyres’ new single ‘These                   Ghosts’ is out now.

It was easy to see why ebullient reggae rock outfit, Mister Twisted (@Mister_Twisted_) headlined this gig. Although technical sound faults set them back, the five piece, which consists of impassioned lead vocalist David Smith- a guy who seemed born to be a frontman- drummer Farrell Howarth, lead guitarist Andy Connor and bassist Adam Pearce, turned things up a notch, with tracks like Supersonic and Unsound Asleep igniting the crowd, uniting them in the euphoria of their evocative sound. Sound engineers Thomas Frith and Daniel Shepherd soon redeemed the technical sound quality meaning songs, Basics and Bohemian really got under the audience’s skin, joining them in a sea of dancing bodies, absorbed in the stirring tunes.

By the time the headliners belted out Colour the intimate venue was packed, with the authentic memorable lyrics striking a chord (…pardon the pun…) with revellers with reggae vibes of the various tracks the band played transporting the audience to a Marley-esque Jamaican beach with a beer in one hand and chilled sounds in both ears. Their rendition of Clint Eastwood went down a treat, but it was Sway that stole the show. Meaningful lyrics, raw and catchy rhyme plus haunting harmonies injected by Johanna Alba beckoned an encore and led to the majority of the crowd exploding into hedonistic dance-the perfect crescendo to end the night on.